Architectural Research for Exchange Students - UI - BMEEPUI0995


  • Architectural research for exchange students - Department of URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN


    Person in charge at the department: Julianna SZABÓ, Árpád SZABÓ
    Lecturers: Zsuzsanna KÖRNER, Gábor LOCSMÁNDI
    Credits: 6
    Hours per week: according to discussion
    Grading: practical task


    The consultants offered by the department:

    • Gábor LOCSMÁNDI - CV
    • Zsuzsanna KÖRNER - CV

  • B1 Orthogonality in the urban fabric

    In the Greek and Roman city planning orthogonality was the basis for planned cities. This easily recognizable planning scheme was used during the medieval centuries and in the baroque town planning too. Orthogonality is valid today as it has ever been. The study can also deal with the different planning tools that enriched the original „clean” orthogonality of Antiquity, like diagonals, segregated traffic, etc. It would be interesting to analyse how the uniform open grid was modified to prevent through traffic and to create more identifiable spaces first of all in residential areas.


    in English - Prof Zsuzsa KÖRNER PhD

    TEAMS link


  • B2 Modernist transformations of existing residential areas , features of modernism in urban plans in the 1930s

    General goals of modernist transformation of historical cities were improvement of living circumstances of working class and low middle class people, demolishing the most densily built up blocks replacing them by parks, squares, residential buildings. Fight against building speculation, against garden city concept. The study ought to offer a comparison of the two typical modernist layouts: 1. parallel housing bars (Zeilenbau) 2. Le Corbusier's redents. 

    The linear apartment blocks, parallel strips or Zeilenbau were generally oriented on a north-south axis to maximise access to daylight. This type of layout as good form for standardization was used for planning new housing estates for working class people mainly in Germany  (see Berlin's and Frankfurt am Main's modernism housing estates). Buildings with setbacks as redents  appeared in different urban plans of Le Corbusier (Plan Voisin, Stockholm, Antwerp etc.).


    in English - Prof. Zsuzsa KÖRNER


    TEAMS link

  • B3 Need for labor saving methods and high rise buildings after the WWII. Different renewal methods of large public housing estates built in the 50s, 60s and 70s.

    Due to housing shortages European countries supported house building systems that had demonstrated a labor saving at the building site. Industrialization of building and the quantitative aspects of housing policies led to town planning adapted to technical demands, standardization, lot division following the course of crane tracks, unfavorable price-quality ratio, etc. The study ought to have to analyse the results of the reduction of variety and lack of identity (meaningless homogeneity) and the advantages of the functionalist's program, like need for light, air, green, etc. Typical problems of our days: socially marginalised populations, bed isolations - expensive management costs, lack of transitional spaces, vandalism, etc.


    in English - Prof. Zsuzsa KÖRNER PhD


    TEAMS link

  • B4 Linear developments as new settlement forms

    The first linear city plans were developed by Arturo Soria y Mata in Madrid at the end of the 19th century. Main goals of the linear city: less populated residential sites, to quicken the transport between the city and countryside, etc. Some of the avantgarde city planners (like desurbanists) of the 30s in Russia proposed dispersing the population. According their plans future settlements would take form of continuous ribbon developments, mobility was predicated upon universal use of cars. Among others N. Milyutin made plans for „socialist” Stalingrad and Magnitogorsk. Later, in the 60s and 70s functionalist principles were partly used in the form of linear cities broadly developed for city expansion and partly used in the form of suburban residential megastructures. Well known plans: Le Corbusier's Obus design (1933), Amsterdam expansion (The Pampus plan, a proposal brought up by J.H. van der Broek and J.B. Bakema) and Corviale in Rome (1975-1985).


    in English - Prof. Zsuzsa KÖRNER PhD


    TEAMS link

  • B5 Need for traffic calming, pedestrianization and car-free zones

    Traffic calming refers to several design features that try to reduce traffic speeds in residential areas. Its techniques and strategies prefer the safety of pedestrians, cyclists and residents, its origins are the woonerfs (shared streets), a Dutch concept of  ”living street”.  Because of the growing number of cars – resulting air and noise pollution – cities try to reduce the number of cars visiting their historical cultural centers, city centers establishing car-free zones (limited access zones). Here personal vehicles are prohibited to use, but public transportation can provide its service. It is suggested to show good techniques and designing solutions used in students' hometowns.


    in English - Prof. Zsuzsa KÖRNER PhD


    • B6 Planning ideas used in designing residential areas between 1950 and 1980. From neighborhood principle to ”street in the air”

      In the 1920s and 1930s some ideas were brought up for showing the relationship between the size of a community, size of the residential unit and the uses easely accessible to residents by foot.  The self-contained neighborhood unit idea of the late 1920s became an important feature of post war innovative urban settings. Because after the war residential units grew bigger, from blocks to superblocks and large housing estates, the so-called Radburn planning techniques – like superblock system and segregation of traffic – developed in the 1930s were used in housing schemes of the 60s and 70s too. The inner parts of superblocks offered safe place for parks, schools and kindergartens.  

      Traffic planning became innovative by introducing pedestrian decks above road level and car parking areas. This deck was reminiscent some of Le Corbusier's inter-war visions.  Sometimes long pedestrian galleries as „streets in the air” were planned for high rise buildings to encourage interactions between residents. The study ought to have to show some urban plans of architects forming the so called famous TEAM X group.


      in English - Prof. Zsuzsa KÖRNER PhD


      TEAMS link

    • B7 Positive and negative impacts of gentrification

      Gentrification process causes increasing prices of land. There is a potential of displacement of original residents because of higher rents, mortgages.  The causes of gentrification is debatable, so the researcher is suggested to deal with changes of the neighborhood's character, with health effects etc. One must answer the following questions: Is the gentrification a global and real problem? What is the impact of arrival of „creative class” (artists, bohemians, etc.). Does the gentrification mean „urban renaissance”? It would be interesting to analyze the changes of one or more concrete urban sites too.


      in English - Prof. Zsuzsa KÖRNER PhD


      TEAMS link

    • B8 Various modes of management of brown-field areas

      Deindustrialisation in Europe resulted in large abandoned, deteriorating urban areas. A widespread program in many cities is a functional and environmental renewal, restructuring of them. But the success of these interventions depends on various factors. A general rewiev and experiences in your country, city.


      in English - Prof. Gábor LOCSMÁNDI PhD



      • B9 Theory of gentrification and as it happens on the site

        The notion, gentrification is interpreted in various ways. A one-sided reading of it is the forced displacement of the poor from advantageously positioned areas. Distinction between market-lead processes and public programs. Overview of the international theoretic literature and the description of a local example.


        in English - Prof. Gábor LOCSMÁNDI PhD

      • B10 Building along the water edge

        Building along large waterways can be attractive and profitable but at the same time extremely dangerous. How could this discrepancy be managed through hydrologic and engineering methods. Show good and bad examples - old and new. Present attractive architectural solutions in various uses (housing, public places etc.)!


        in English - Prof. Gábor LOCSMÁNDI PhD

      • B11 Traffic calming in various urban areas

        In the 1970s in many European cities there appeared the pedestrian shopping street. Later the concept widened into larger areas both in the downtowns and in residential districts. What are the main preconditions for the success of these urban projects? General overwiev and local examples – good and bad.


        in English - Prof. Gábor LOCSMÁNDI PhD

      • B12 Patterns of social housing in Europe - and in your country

        Social housing is generally seen as building cheap medium quality residences for the poor. Nowdays policies focus on „affordable housing” produced by the private sector with public subsidies through various methods of Public Private Partnerships. Give a simple overwiev of your country’s policies and show some architecturally good results.


        in English - Prof. Gábor LOCSMÁNDI PhD